Hybrid Cloud Illustrated

What happens when you combine IT managers and hybrid cloud experts with an illustrator? Hybrid cloud as you’ve never seen it before! Last month, Dinko Eror, EMC’s VP Global Services, hosted the #hybridcloudchat, taking to Twitter to discuss what is holding businesses back from reaping the benefits of hybrid cloud, with a live illustrator bringing the themes to life. You can find all the final illustrations here, and if you’d like to find out more about hybrid cloud, check out the highlights here, or visit EMC’s Hybrid Cloud page here.

#HybridCloudChat Highlights

Dinko_thumbLast week, we held EMC’s first ever illustrated Twitter chat on the topic of hybrid cloud. Hosted by EMC’s VP of Global Services, Dinko Eror, the chat touched on the challenges businesses are facing when it comes to deploying hybrid cloud, and what is required to achieve a well-run hybrid cloud.

A big thank you to everybody who took part – it was great to see the involvement from people the world over, and from the discussion it’s clear that for many the hybrid cloud adventure is only just starting. You can see the chat in full here on Crowdchat and we’ve summarized the key themes and conclusion below.

Defining Hybrid Cloud

Is hybrid cloud simply a combination of public and private, or is it more? Just like with baking a cake, you need all the right ingredients, and a good chef to ensure they’re combined in the right way. Otherwise, despite investing in all of the resources of a hybrid cloud, you may see none of the benefits. True hybrid means controlling your workloads, storage and network resources so it limits risk and increase productivity, i.e. you need public and private cloud infrastructure, made transparent by a management platform. For us, of course, this is where solutions come in that can accelerate the adoption: VCE VBlock or EMC VSPEX , as well as the light-weight, software-defined storage solution EMC VIPR.

Challenges to hybrid cloud adoption

For some, there is clearly an expectation that it will be really difficult to deploy hybrid cloud. However, with fully engineered solutions available, technical complexity is immediately reduced. Security, data control and legacy contracts can still be a concern. For others, another issue limiting hybrid cloud adoption is that it can be hard to implement an architectural strategy when IT teams are focused on day to day application and infrastructure priorities.

Where can hybrid cloud best serve companies?

Although there are a lot of applications for hybrid cloud, it’s mainly the new, third platform applications that will really benefit from a hybrid environment. We’re talking apps that need to scale in some places, require performance in others and data protection in others still. On top of that, hybrid cloud will bring with it cost efficiency, and will allow IT to move at the speed of business.

When we discussed the types of business where hybrid cloud can best be applied – the answer seemed to be every one of them. The underpinning problem hybrid cloud addresses – of managing complex information management needs whilst containing spend, delivering scale and controlling risk – is universal in any business of any scale today.

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Orchestration and Standardisation

A properly orchestrated hybrid cloud lets you set policies and retain control over your data. That’s why it important to get it right. But who is in charge of orchestration? The CIO should make these decisions, but currently many are facing the challenge of juggling all the different demands coming from varying lines of business. This has to be brought together, and complexity must be reduced to get the control back. Standardisation is key and many hybrid cloud adopters see this as a key factor in delivering the benefits hybrid cloud has to offer.

Essentially, in order to have a well-run hybrid cloud and to experience all the benefits that come with it, people, process and technology need to be aligned.

For more information, please visit our website at http://emc.im/EHC_UK

This was originally posted on the EMC Thoughtfeast Blog

How can we convince patients their data is safe?

Following news of patient data being sold, James Norman, UK Public Sector CIO, EMC, considers what’s required to change the perception of data use in healthcare.

This week’s news that medical records have been sold following data capture when claiming insurance or purchasing holidays or medical products is concerning to anyone who wants more transparency as to how their data is going to used. Equally, the news that NHS patient details have been sold after prescriptions were purchased online is hugely damaging to the data discussion in the healthcare sector. The reality is that there are huge opportunities for improving patient care and driving efficiencies in healthcare through better use of data, but stories such as these are damaging patient confidence and their likelihood to share data in the future.

Within the healthcare sector, data can be used to create a more predictive and personalised healthcare model; contributing significantly to medical research and a more positive patient experience.

Ultimately this can shift the NHS from an illness to a wellness model.

Informatics can now identify the risk factors that put the patient at high risk of developing a condition and help tackle it before it strikes. Monitoring patients using data can also dramatically improve care management. A recent report from EMC and Volterra highlighted the need for acceleration in the uptake of data analytics techniques and technologies to drive £16bn or more in efficiency savings to plug the NHS funding gap.

With all these potential benefits available to the healthcare sector, it’s crucial the discussion isn’t shut down before it’s even begun. It’s essential consumers understand how data can be used to benefit them and the wider population, rather than feeling as though their data is being used solely to aid sales and increase insurance premiums. As part of this, it’s crucial the government scrutinise legislation to ensure patient data is protected and to ensure a greater transparency around how data is being used in healthcare. The major challenge sits in providing proof points for data, leading to greater good and encouraging best practice across the entire healthcare sector.

The future of healthcare will require the right people to have access to patient’s data, with their consent, allowing them to provide appropriate care based on a full understanding of the patient’s history. This can drive real change in how we are able to predict and tackle health problems across the population, particularly around chronic diseases, and drive an efficient and effective health service in the UK.

Until that point, it’s down to the government and industry to tackle the data challenge together and convince patients that giving access to some of their personal data will be beneficial to the health of the nation and, ultimately, their own.